Corneal surgery/ corneal grafting/ corneal transplant

The cornea is the clear outer lens on the front of the eye. The cornea is made of layers of cells. These layers work together to protect your eye and provide clear vision.

Your cornea must be clear, smooth and healthy for good vision. If it is swollen, scarred or damaged, light is not focused accurately into the eye. As a result, your vision is blurry or you see glare. A cornea transplant replaces diseased or scarred corneal tissue with healthy tissue from an organ donor.

There are two main kinds of cornea transplants: traditional, full thickness cornea transplant (also known as penetrating keratoplasty, or PK) and back layer/ Partial-thickness cornea transplant (also known as endothelial keratoplasty, or EK).

A graft replaces central corneal tissue, damaged due to disease or eye injury, with healthy corneal tissue donated from a local eye bank. An affected cornea affects your vision by scattering or distorting light and causing glare and blurred vision. A cornea transplant may be necessary to restore your functional vision.

Corneal eye disease is the fourth most common cause of blindness (after cataracts, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration) and affects more than 10 million people worldwide.