Diabetic eye disease

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. People with diabetes can have an eye disease called diabetic retinopathy. This is when high blood sugar levels cause damage to blood vessels in the retina. These blood vessels can swell and leak. Or they can close, stopping blood from passing through. Over time, this can damage your eyes. Diabetic eye disease incorporate a group of eye problems that patient with diabetes may face as a complication of diabetes. People with diabetes are at risk for diabetic retinopathy, cataract and glaucoma. Diabetic eye disease has no warning signs. Finding and treating the disease earliest, before it effects vision impairments or blindness, is the best way to control diabetic eye disease. If you have diabetes, make sure you get a dilated eye examination at least once a year.

Diabetic retinopathy is the most broad diabetic eye disease and a main cause of blindness in adults. It is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. In some people with diabetic retinopathy, blood vessels may swell and leak fluid. In other people, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. A healthy retina is required for good vision. If you have diabetic retinopathy, at first you may not notice changes to your vision. But over time, diabetic retinopathy can get worse and cause vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy usually affects both eyes.